Topic 201 - Intangible assets and goodwill

This topic includes FAQs relating to the following IFRS standards, IFRIC Interpretations and SIC Interpretations:

IAS 38 Intangible Assets

IFRIC 20 Stripping Costs in the Production Phase of a Surface Mine

SIC 32 Intangible Assets—Web Site Costs

 

Other resources

  • IFRS At a Glance by standard is available here

 

Sub-topic within this main topic are set out below, with links to IFRS Interpretation Committee agenda decisions and BDO IFRS FAQs relating to that sub-topic below each sub-topic:

Sub-topic Number Sub-topic and Related FAQ
201.1 Scope and definitions
  • 201.1.1.1
  • 201.1.1.2
201.2 Definition of intangible assets
  • 201.2.1.1
201.3 Recognition and measurement
  • 201.3.1.1
201.4 Separate acquisition of intangible assets
  • 201.4.1.1
201.5 Internally generated intangible assets
201.6 Measurement after recognition
  • 201.6.1.1
201.7 Useful life
201.8 Intangible assets with finite useful lives
201.9 Intangible assets with indefinite useful lives
  • 201.9.1.1
201.10 Retirements and disposals
201.11 Disclosure
  • 201.11.1.1
201.12 Other issues
  • 201.12.1.1

 

FAQ#

Title

Text of FAQ

201.1.1.1

IFRIC Agenda Decisions - Holdings of Cryptocurrencies

June 2019 - The Committee discussed how IFRS Standards apply to holdings of cryptocurrencies.

The Committee noted that a range of cryptoassets exist. For the purposes of its discussion, the Committee considered a subset of cryptoassets with all the following characteristics that this agenda decision refers to as a ‘cryptocurrency’:

a.

a digital or virtual currency recorded on a distributed ledger that uses cryptography for security.

b.

not issued by a jurisdictional authority or other party.

c.

does not give rise to a contract between the holder and another party.

Nature of a cryptocurrency

Paragraph 8 of IAS 38 Intangible Assets defines an intangible asset as ‘an identifiable non-monetary asset without physical substance’.

Paragraph 12 of IAS 38 states that an asset is identifiable if it is separable or arises from contractual or other legal rights. An asset is separable if it ‘is capable of being separated or divided from the entity and sold, transferred, licensed, rented or exchanged, either individually or together with a related contract, identifiable asset or liability’.

Paragraph 16 of IAS 21 The Effects of Changes in Foreign Exchange Rates states that ‘the essential feature of a non-monetary item is the absence of a right to receive (or an obligation to deliver) a fixed or determinable number of units of currency’.

 

The Committee observed that a holding of cryptocurrency meets the definition of an intangible asset in IAS 38 on the grounds that (a) it is capable of being separated from the holder and sold or transferred individually; and (b) it does not give the holder a right to receive a fixed or determinable number of units of currency.

Which IFRS Standard applies to holdings of cryptocurrencies?

The Committee concluded that IAS 2 Inventories applies to cryptocurrencies when they are held for sale in the ordinary course of business. If IAS 2 is not applicable, an entity applies IAS 38 to holdings of cryptocurrencies. The Committee considered the following in reaching its conclusion.

 

Intangible Asset

IAS 38 applies in accounting for all intangible assets except:

a.

those that are within the scope of another Standard;

b.

financial assets, as defined in IAS 32 Financial Instruments: Presentation;

c.

the recognition and measurement of exploration and evaluation assets; and

d.

expenditure on the development and extraction of minerals, oil, natural gas and similar non-regenerative resources.

Accordingly, the Committee considered whether a holding of cryptocurrency meets the definition of a financial asset in IAS 32 or is within the scope of another Standard.

Financial asset

Paragraph 11 of IAS 32 defines a financial asset. In summary, a financial asset is any asset that is: (a) cash; (b) an equity instrument of another entity; (c) a contractual right to receive cash or another financial asset from another entity; (d) a contractual right to exchange financial assets or financial liabilities with another entity under particular conditions; or (e) a particular contract that will or may be settled in the entity’s own equity instruments.

The Committee concluded that a holding of cryptocurrency is not a financial asset. This is because a cryptocurrency is not cash (see below). Nor is it an equity instrument of another entity. It does not give rise to a contractual right for the holder and it is not a contract that will or may be settled in the holder’s own equity instruments.

Cash

Paragraph AG3 of IAS 32 states that ‘currency (cash) is a financial asset because it represents the medium of exchange and is therefore the basis on which all transactions are measured and recognised in financial statements. A deposit of cash with a bank or similar financial institution is a financial asset because it represents the contractual right of the depositor to obtain cash from the institution or to draw a cheque or similar instrument against the balance in favour of a creditor in payment of a financial liability’. 

The Committee observed that the description of cash in paragraph AG3 of IAS 32 implies that cash is expected to be used as a medium of exchange (ie used in exchange for goods or services) and as the monetary unit in pricing goods or services to such an extent that it would be the basis on which all transactions are measured and recognised in financial statements. 

Some cryptocurrencies can be used in exchange for particular good or services. However, the Committee noted that it is not aware of any cryptocurrency that is used as a medium of exchange and as the monetary unit in pricing goods or services to such an extent that it would be the basis on which all transactions are measured and recognised in financial statements. Consequently, the Committee concluded that a holding of cryptocurrency is not cash because cryptocurrencies do not currently have the characteristics of cash.

Inventory

IAS 2 applies to inventories of intangible assets. Paragraph 6 of that Standard defines inventories as assets:

a.

held for sale in the ordinary course of business;

b.

in the process of production for such sale; or

c.

in the form of materials or supplies to be consumed in the production process or in the rendering of services.

The Committee observed that an entity may hold cryptocurrencies for sale in the ordinary course of business. In that circumstance, a holding of cryptocurrency is inventory for the entity and, accordingly, IAS 2 applies to that holding.

The Committee also observed that an entity may act as a broker-trader of cryptocurrencies. In that circumstance, the entity considers the requirements in paragraph 3(b) of IAS 2 for commodity broker-traders who measure their inventories at fair value less costs to sell. Paragraph 5 of IAS 2 states that broker-traders are those who buy or sell commodities for others or on their own account. The inventories referred to in paragraph 3(b) are principally acquired with the purpose of selling in the near future and generating a profit from fluctuations in price or broker-traders’ margin.

Disclosure

In addition to disclosures otherwise required by IFRS Standards, an entity is required to disclose any additional information that is relevant to an understanding of its financial statements (paragraph 112 of IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements). In particular, the Committee noted the following disclosure requirements in the context of holdings of cryptocurrencies:

a.

An entity provides the disclosures required by (i) paragraphs 36⁠–⁠39 of IAS 2 for cryptocurrencies held for sale in the ordinary course of business; and (ii) paragraphs 118⁠–⁠128 of IAS 38 for holdings of cryptocurrencies to which it applies IAS 38.

b.

If an entity measures holdings of cryptocurrencies at fair value, paragraphs 91⁠–⁠99 of IFRS 13 Fair Value Measurement specify applicable disclosure requirements.

c.

Applying paragraph 122 of IAS 1, an entity discloses judgements that its management has made regarding its accounting for holdings of cryptocurrencies if those are part of the judgements that had the most significant effect on the amounts recognised in the financial statements.

d.

Paragraph 21 of IAS 10 Events after the Reporting Period requires an entity to disclose details of any material non-adjusting events, including information about the nature of the event and an estimate of its financial effect (or a statement that such an estimate cannot be made). For example, an entity holding cryptocurrencies would consider whether changes in the fair value of those holdings after the reporting period are of such significance that non-disclosure could influence the economic decisions that users of financial statements make on the basis of the financial statements.

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201.1.1.2

IFRIC Agenda Decisions - Training Costs to Fulfil a Contract

March 2020 - The Committee received a request about training costs incurred to fulfil a contract with a customer. In the fact pattern described in the request:

a.

an entity enters into a contract with a customer that is within the scope of IFRS 15. The contract is for the supply of outsourced services.

b.

to be able to provide the services to the customer, the entity incurs costs to train its employees so that they understand the customer’s equipment and processes. The training costs are as described in paragraph 15 of IAS 38 Intangible Assets—the entity has insufficient control over the expected future economic benefits arising from the training to meet the definition of an intangible asset because employees can leave the entity’s employment. Applying IFRS 15, the entity does not identify the training activities as a performance obligation.

c.

the contract permits the entity to charge to the customer the costs of training (i) the entity’s employees at the beginning of the contract, and (ii) new employees that the entity hires as a result of any expansion of the customer’s operations.

The request asked whether the entity recognises the training costs as an asset or an expense when incurred.

Which IFRS Standard applies to the training costs?

Paragraph 95 of IFRS 15 requires an entity to recognise an asset from the costs incurred to fulfil a contract with a customer if the costs are not within the scope of another IFRS Standard, and only if those costs meet all three criteria specified in paragraph 95. Consequently, before assessing the criteria in paragraph 95, the entity first considers whether the training costs incurred to fulfil the contract are within the scope of another IFRS Standard.

Paragraphs 2⁠–⁠7 of IAS 38 describe the scope of that Standard—paragraph 5 explicitly includes expenditure on training within IAS 38’s scope, stating that IAS 38 ‘applies to, among other things, expenditure on advertising, training, start-up, research and development activities’. Accordingly, the Committee concluded that, in the fact pattern described in the request, the entity applies IAS 38 in accounting for the training costs incurred to fulfil the contract with the customer.

Application of IAS 38

Paragraph 69(b) of IAS 38 includes expenditure on training activities as an example of expenditure that is incurred ‘to provide future economic benefits to an entity, but no intangible asset or other asset is acquired or created that can be recognised’. Consequently, paragraph 69 states that such expenditure on training activities is recognised as an expense when incurred. Paragraph 15 of IAS 38 explains that ‘an entity usually has insufficient control over the expected future economic benefits arising from a team of skilled staff and from training for these items to meet the definition of an intangible asset’.

In addition, in explaining the requirements in IFRS 15 regarding costs to fulfil a contract, paragraph BC307 of IFRS 15 states that ‘if the other Standards preclude the recognition of any asset arising from a particular cost, an asset cannot then be recognised under IFRS 15’.

Accordingly, the Committee concluded that, in the fact pattern described in the request, the entity recognises the training costs to fulfil the contract with the customer as an expense when incurred. The Committee noted that the entity’s ability to charge to the customer the costs of training does not affect that conclusion.

The Committee concluded that the principles and requirements in IFRS 15 and IAS 38 provide an adequate basis for an entity to determine its accounting for training costs incurred to fulfil a contract with a customer. Consequently, the Committee decided not to add the matter to its standard-setting agenda.

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201.2.1.1

IFRIC Agenda Decisions - Customer’s Right to Receive Access to the Supplier’s Software Hosted on the Cloud

March 2019 - The Committee received a request about how a customer accounts for a ‘Software as a Service’ cloud computing arrangement in which the customer contracts to pay a fee in exchange for a right to receive access to the supplier’s application software for a specified term. The supplier’s software runs on cloud infrastructure managed and controlled by the supplier. The customer accesses the software on an as needed basis over the internet or via a dedicated line. The contract does not convey to the customer any rights over tangible assets.

Does the customer receive a software asset at the contract commencement date or a service over the contract term?

The Committee noted that a customer receives a software asset at the contract commencement date if either (a) the contract contains a software lease, or (b) the customer otherwise obtains control of software at the contract commencement date.

A software lease

 

IFRS 16 Leases defines a lease as ‘a contract, or part of a contract, that conveys the right to use an asset (the underlying asset) for a period of time in exchange for consideration’. Paragraphs 9 and B9 of IFRS 16 explain that a contract conveys the right to use an asset if, throughout the period of use, the customer has both:

a.

the right to obtain substantially all the economic benefits from use of the asset (an identified asset); and

b.

the right to direct the use of that asset.

Paragraphs B9⁠–⁠B31 of IFRS 16 provide application guidance on the definition of a lease. Among other requirements, that application guidance specifies that a customer generally has the right to direct the use of an asset by having decision-making rights to change how and for what purpose the asset is used throughout the period of use. Accordingly, in a contract that contains a lease the supplier has given up those decision-making rights and transferred them to the customer at the lease commencement date.

The Committee observed that a right to receive future access to the supplier’s software running on the supplier’s cloud infrastructure does not in itself give the customer any decision-making rights about how and for what purpose the software is used—the supplier would have those rights by, for example, deciding how and when to update or reconfigure the software, or deciding on which hardware (or infrastructure) the software will run. Accordingly, if a contract conveys to the customer only the right to receive access to the supplier’s application software over the contract term, the contract does not contain a software lease.

A software intangible asset

 

IAS 38 defines an intangible asset as ‘an identifiable non-monetary asset without physical substance’. It notes that an asset is a resource controlled by the entity and paragraph 13 specifies that an entity controls an intangible asset if it has the power to obtain the future economic benefits flowing from the underlying resource and to restrict the access of others to those benefits.

The Committee observed that, if a contract conveys to the customer only the right to receive access to the supplier’s application software over the contract term, the customer does not receive a software intangible asset at the contract commencement date. A right to receive future access to the supplier’s software does not, at the contract commencement date, give the customer the power to obtain the future economic benefits flowing from the software itself and to restrict others’ access to those benefits.

Consequently, the Committee concluded that a contract that conveys to the customer only the right to receive access to the supplier’s application software in the future is a service contract. The customer receives the service—the access to the software—over the contract term. If the customer pays the supplier before it receives the service, that prepayment gives the customer a right to future service and is an asset for the customer.

The Committee concluded that the requirements in IFRS Standards provide an adequate basis for an entity to account for fees paid or payable to receive access to the supplier’s application software in Software as a Service arrangements. Consequently, the Committee decided not to add this matter to its standard-setting agenda.

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201.3.1.1

IFRIC Agenda Decision - Configuration or Customisation Costs in a Cloud Computing Arrangement

April 2021 - The Committee received a request about how a customer accounts for costs of configuring or customising a supplier’s application software in a Software as a Service (SaaS) arrangement. In the fact pattern described in the request:

a. a customer enters into a SaaS arrangement with a supplier. The contract conveys to the customer the right to receive access to the supplier’s application software over the contract term. That right to receive access does not provide the customer with a software asset and, therefore, the access to the software is a service that the customer receives over the contract term.

b. the customer incurs costs of configuring or customising the supplier’s application software to which the customer receives access. The request describes configuration and customisation as follows: i. configuration involves the setting of various ‘flags’ or ‘switches’ within the application software, or defining values or parameters, to set up the software’s existing code to function in a specified way.

ii. customisation involves modifying the software code in the application or writing additional code. Customisation generally changes, or creates additional, functionalities within the software.

 

c. the customer receives no other goods or services.

In analysing the request, the Committee considered:

a. whether, applying IAS 38, the customer recognises an intangible asset in relation to configuration or customisation of the application software (Question I).

b. if an intangible asset is not recognised, how the customer accounts for the configuration or customisation costs (Question II).

 

Does the customer recognise an intangible asset in relation to configuration or customisation of the application software (Question I)?

Applying paragraph 18 of IAS 38, an entity recognises an item as an intangible asset when the entity demonstrates that the item meets both the definition of an intangible asset and the recognition criteria in paragraphs 21–23 of IAS 38. IAS 38 defines an intangible asset as ‘an identifiable non-monetary asset without physical substance’. IAS 38 notes that an asset is a resource controlled by an entity and paragraph 13 specifies that an entity controls an asset if it has ‘the power to obtain the future economic benefits flowing from the underlying resource and to restrict the access of others to those benefits’.

In the fact pattern described in the request, the supplier controls the application software to which the customer has access. The assessment of whether configuration or customisation of that software results in an intangible asset for the customer depends on the nature and output of the configuration or customisation performed. The Committee observed that, in the SaaS arrangement described in the request, the customer often would not recognise an intangible asset because it does not control the software being configured or customised and those configuration or customisation activities do not create a resource controlled by the customer that is separate from the software. In some circumstances, however, the arrangement may result in, for example, additional code from which the customer has the power to obtain the future economic benefits and to restrict others’ access to those benefits. In that case, in determining whether to recognise the additional code as an intangible asset, the customer assesses whether the additional code is identifiable and meets the recognition criteria in IAS 38.

If an intangible asset is not recognised, how does the customer account for the configuration or customisation costs (Question II)?

If the customer does not recognise an intangible asset in relation to configuration or customisation of the application software, it applies paragraphs 68–70 of IAS 38 to account for those costs. The Committee observed that:

a. the customer recognises the costs as an expense when it receives the configuration or customisation services (paragraph 69). Paragraph 69A specifies that ‘services are received when they are performed by a supplier in accordance with a contract to deliver them to the entity and not when the entity uses them to deliver another service’. In assessing when to recognise the costs as an expense, IAS 38 therefore requires the customer to determine when the supplier performs the configuration or customisation services in accordance with the contract to deliver those services.

b. IAS 38 includes no requirements that deal with the identification of the services the customer receives in determining when the supplier performs those services in accordance with the contract to deliver them. Paragraphs 10–11 of IAS 8 Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors require the customer to refer to, and consider the applicability of, the requirements in IFRS Standards that deal with similar and related issues. The Committee observed that IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers includes requirements that suppliers apply in identifying the promised goods or services in a contract with a customer. For the fact pattern described in the request, those requirements in IFRS 15 deal with issues similar and related to those faced by the customer in determining when the supplier performs the configuration or customisation services in accordance with the contract to deliver those services.

c. if the contract to deliver the configuration or customisation services to the customer is with the supplier of the application software (including cases in which the supplier subcontracts services to a third party), the customer applies paragraphs 69–69A of IAS 38 and determines when the supplier of the application software performs those services in accordance with the contract to deliver them as follows: i. if the services the customer receives are distinct, then the customer recognises the costs as an expense when the supplier configures or customises the application software.

ii. if the services the customer receives are not distinct (because those services are not separately identifiable from the customer’s right to receive access to the supplier’s application software), then the customer recognises the costs as an expense when the supplier provides access to the application software over the contract term.

d. if the contract to deliver the configuration or customisation services to the customer is with a third-party supplier, the customer applies paragraphs 69–69A of IAS 38 and determines when the third-party supplier performs those services in accordance with the contract to deliver them. In applying these requirements, the customer recognises the costs as an expense when the third-party supplier configures or customises the application software.

e. if the customer pays the supplier of the configuration or customisation services before receiving those services, it recognises the prepayment as an asset (paragraph 70 of IAS 38).

 

Paragraphs 117–124 of IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements require the customer to disclose its accounting policy for configuration or customisation costs when that disclosure is relevant to an understanding of its financial statements.

The Committee concluded that the principles and requirements in IFRS Standards provide an adequate basis for a customer to determine its accounting for configuration or customisation costs incurred in relation to the SaaS arrangement described in the request. Consequently, the Committee decided not to add a standard-setting project to the work plan.

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201.4.1.1

IFRIC Agenda Decisions - Variable payments for asset purchases

March 2016 - The Interpretations Committee received a request to address the accounting for variable payments to be made for the purchase of an item of property, plant and equipment or an intangible asset that is not part of a business combination.

The Interpretations Committee observed significant diversity in practice in accounting for these variable payments. It discussed the accounting, both at the date of purchasing the asset and thereafter, for variable payments that depend on the purchaser’s future activity as well as those that do not depend on such future activity.

The Interpretations Committee was unable to reach a consensus on whether an entity (the purchaser) recognises a liability at the date of purchasing the asset for variable payments that depend on its future activity or, instead, recognises such a liability only when the related activity occurs. The Interpretations Committee was also unable to reach a consensus on how the purchaser measures a liability for such variable payments.

In deliberating the accounting for variable payments that depend on the purchaser’s future activity, the Interpretations Committee considered the proposed definition of a liability in the May 2015 Exposure Draft The Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting as well as the deliberations of the Board on its project on leases. The Interpretations Committee observed that, during the Board’s deliberations on its project on leases, the Board did not conclude on whether variable payments linked to future performance or use of the underlying asset meet the definition of a liability at commencement of a lease or, instead, meet that definition only at the time that the related performance or use occurs.

In addition, the Interpretations Committee noted that there are questions about the accounting for variable payments subsequent to the purchase of the asset. Accordingly, the Interpretations Committee concluded that the Board should address the accounting for variable payments comprehensively.

The Interpretations Committee determined that this issue is too broad for it to address within the confines of existing IFRS Standards. Consequently, the Interpretations Committee decided not to add this issue to its agenda.

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201.6.1.1

IFRIC Agenda Decisions - Goods acquired for promotional activities

September 2017 - The Committee received a request about how an entity accounts for goods it distributes as part of its promotional activities. In the fact pattern described in the request, a pharmaceutical entity acquires goods (such as refrigerators, air conditioners and watches) to distribute to doctors as part of its promotional activities. The entity and the doctors do not enter into agreements that create enforceable rights and obligations in relation to those goods. The request asked how the entity accounts for any such goods that remain undistributed at its reporting date.

Paragraph 5 of IAS 38 states that IAS 38 applies to expenditure on advertising activities. Accordingly, the Committee concluded that if an entity acquires goods solely to be used to undertake advertising or promotional activities, it applies the requirements in paragraph 69 of IAS 38. Paragraph 69 requires an entity to recognise expenditure on such goods as an expense when the entity has a right to access those goods. Paragraph 69A of IAS 38 states that an entity has a right to access goods when it owns them. The entity, therefore, recognises expenditure on those goods as an expense when it owns the goods, or otherwise has a right to access them regardless of when it distributes the goods.

In explaining the Board’s rationale for the requirements in paragraph 69, paragraph BC46B of IAS 38 states that goods acquired to be used to undertake advertising and promotional activities have no other purpose than to undertake those activities. In other words, the only benefit of those goods for the entity is to develop or create brands or customer relationships, which in turn generate revenues. However, applying IAS 38, the entity does not recognise internally generated brands or customer relationships as assets.

The Committee concluded that the requirements in IFRS Standards provide an adequate basis for an entity to account for the goods described in the request. Consequently, the Committee decided not to add this matter to its standard-setting‑agenda.

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201.9.1.1

IFRIC Agenda Decisions - Amortisation method

January 2010 - The IFRIC received requests for guidance on the meaning of ‘consumption of economic benefits’ when determining the appropriate amortisation method for an intangible asset with a finite useful life. The methods considered in the submissions are the straight‑line method and the unit of production method (including a revenue‑based unit of production method).

The IFRIC noted that paragraph 98 of IAS 38 states that ‘the method used is based on the expected pattern of consumption of the expected future economic benefits embodied in the asset…’ Some members of the IFRIC believed that an interpretation could assist in reducing diversity in the implementation of this principle, while others considered that any guidance would be in the nature of application guidance. The IFRIC noted that the determination of the amortisation method is therefore a matter of judgement. In addition, in accordance with paragraph 122 of IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements, significant judgements made in determining the amortisation methods should be disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

 

Given the diversity of views, the IFRIC concluded that it would not be able to reach a consensus on the issue on a timely basis. Therefore, the IFRIC decided not to add the issue to its agenda.

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201.11.1.1

IFRIC Agenda Decisions - Player Transfer Payments

June 2020 - The Committee received a request about the recognition of player transfer payments received. In the fact pattern described in the request:

a.

a football club (entity) transfers a player to another club (receiving club). When the entity recruited the player, the entity registered the player in an electronic transfer system. Registration means the player is prohibited from playing for another club, and requires the registering club to have an employment contract with the player that prevents the player from leaving the club without mutual agreement. Together the employment contract and registration in the electronic transfer system are referred to as a ‘registration right’.

b.

the entity had recognised costs incurred to obtain the registration right as an intangible asset applying IAS 38. As part of its ordinary activities, the entity uses and develops the player through participation in matches, and then potentially transfers the player to another club.

c.

the entity and the receiving club enter into a transfer agreement under which the entity receives a transfer payment from the receiving club. The transfer payment compensates the entity for releasing the player from the employment contract before the contract ends. The registration in the electronic transfer system is not transferred to the receiving club but, legally, is extinguished when the receiving club registers the player and obtains a new right.

d.

the entity derecognises its intangible asset upon the receiving club registering the player in the electronic transfer system.

The request asked whether the entity recognises the transfer payment received as revenue applying IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers or, instead, recognises the gain or loss arising from the derecognition of the intangible asset in profit or loss applying IAS 38.

 

Recognition of transfer payment received

In the fact pattern described in the request, the entity recognised the registration right as an intangible asset applying IAS 38. Accordingly, the entity applies the derecognition requirements in IAS 38 on derecognition of that right.

Paragraph 113 of IAS 38 states that ‘the gain or loss arising from the derecognition of an intangible asset shall be determined as the difference between the net disposal proceeds, if any, and the carrying amount of the asset. It shall be recognised in profit or loss when the asset is derecognised … Gains shall not be classified as revenue’. Applying that paragraph, the entity recognises in profit or loss, but not as revenue, the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the registration right.

Does the transfer payment represent disposal proceeds?

 

The transfer payment arises from the transfer agreement, which requires the entity to release the player from the employment contract. The entity is therefore required to undertake some action for the right to be extinguished. Accordingly, the transfer payment compensates the entity for its action in disposing of the registration right and, thus, is part of the net disposal proceeds described in paragraph 113 of IAS 38.

The Committee concluded that, in the fact pattern described in the request, the entity recognises the transfer payment received as part of the gain or loss arising from the derecognition of the registration right applying paragraph 113 of IAS 38. In the fact pattern described in the request (in which the entity recognises the registration right as an intangible asset), the entity does not recognise the transfer payment received, or any gain arising, as revenue applying IFRS 15.

Statement of cash flows

IAS 7 Statement of Cash Flows lists cash receipts from sales of intangibles as an example of cash flows arising from investing activities. Accordingly, in the fact pattern described in the request, the entity presents cash receipts from transfer payments as part of investing activities. 

 

The Committee concluded that the principles and requirements in IFRS Standards provide an adequate basis for the entity to determine the recognition of player transfer payments received. Consequently, the Committee decided not to add the matter to its standard-setting agenda.

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201.12.1.1

IFRIC Agenda Decisions - Compliance costs for REACH

July 2009 - The IFRIC received a request to add an item to its agenda to provide guidance on the treatment of costs incurred to comply with the requirements of the European Regulation concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH). The Regulation came into force in part on 1 June 2007 and companies had begun to account for the first costs incurred to comply.

At its meetings in March and May 2009 the IFRIC considered detailed background information, an analysis of the issue, current practice and an assessment of the issue against its agenda criteria. The IFRIC noted that IAS 38 includes definitions and recognition criteria for intangible assets that provide guidance to enable entities to account for the costs of complying with the REACH regulation.

The IFRIC concluded that any guidance it could develop beyond that already given would be more in the nature of implementation guidance than an interpretation. For this reason, the IFRIC decided not to add the issue to its agenda.

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